Irish Funeral

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Memory’s phantom acquires its exit through an uninhibited window, silencing your time on this plane. The crying begins as recollections are held ransom behind tapestries, banging around the home of this grievance party. At 3 A.M. we arrested the clocks to signify when you passed between our two worlds. We sabotaged the reflection of our mirrors carefully under cloth, preventing your metaphysical residue from clinging to its earthly memories. Spirits spill sentiments between floor boards and brew aggression that brawls within broken glass. The party burned for two days and then laid his body to rest.

Columns of kin corrupt uncomfortably padded pews, brandishing bourbon aroma, exercising booze lit tears. Taper wax descends a candy wick delirium. Sobering sobs strip and humble us before a perforated Christ. Lips crucified in gloss. Carnations and chrysanthemums decorate our remembrance and close the casket of his time.

image and poetry © J. Gomez

I can be found here…Confetti and coffee

19 Comments Add yours

  1. Mia Pharaoh says:

    Hi J,

    This is such a creative narrative, a dark rite of passage. Your imagery and metaphors are terrific and beautifully ambiguous at times, leaving me wondering if I am vicariously honoring the newly departed or the already dead. Many wonderful phrases, just to mention a few: “grievance party” and “we arrested the clocks”. With your clever use of words this piece also takes me to the flip side of white. I really enjoyed Irish Funeral and I’m look forward to reading more of your work. ~ Mia

    P.S. I adore the photo, wondering if there more of a story there?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. J. Gomez says:

      Thank you. I appreciate your assessment of the poem and your kind words.
      The poem has alot to do with folklore and tradition.
      A long time ago when a person passed away, the surviving family would keep the body of the departed in the home for a few days. The family would drink. Have food. Tell stories.
      The part about the clocks was something of folkore/superstition. Family members would stop the clock to signify the time of death of the person who died.

      I took the photo while I was working. I’m a funeral assistant and that was at a local cemetery. I really like the statues. They make me think of the movie, the never ending story.

      Thanks again!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Mia Pharaoh says:

        You’re welcome. Thank you for the detailed reply. I like the sphinxes too, in fact they’re charming!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. What a fantastic post! I agree with Mia, many wonderful phrases and rich imagery. And the photo is amazing.
    My husband is a pastor, I have been to many funerals and I find them fascinating. I also adore cemeteries and the wake idea…here in Australia, there seems to be little interest in spending time with the departed after they have left this dimension. When we lived in the States, we found people were open and more used to having viewings and wakes etc, which I really appreciated. I think it is so important for the grieving process.

    I am curious how you like your job as a funeral assistant?

    -Vanessa

    Liked by 2 people

    1. J. Gomez says:

      Thank you Vanessa. I agree there is ususally quite a bit that goes on when celebrating the life of someone who has passed away. I also find it interesting that Australia does things a litte different than in the United Ststes. I wouldn’t have guessed.
      I think you’re right, having a wake or visitation can be a very healthy part of the grieving process.

      I like the work I do. Being able to be a part of someone’s life that way is special. And I take it very serious. Even if I’m doing something as small as helping arrange flowers in the chapel for a service.
      It’s actually a very rewarding job.
      Thank you again for your comments.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You are very welcome!
        I am sure it would be rewarding. I don’t think there is a greater privilege than being with people as they are dying, and then respecting them in this way after they have departed. I am happy for you that you are doing something you really like. I’m sure everyone involved appreciates it too!
        Thank you for sharing this with us.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Mia Pharaoh says:

    Reblogged this on Copper Cranes and commented:

    Please enjoy J’s wonderful tribute to a passing, Irish Funeral.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Being of Welsh-Irish descent I was whisked away to my mother’s wake, her body in the main room,deep in the casket as tiny as a bird, barely visible among the Carnations and lilies, their scent mingling with alcohol, the deceased never alone. Mourners sobbing one moment, laughing merrily the next, they came and went throughout the day and night.
    This is among the most emotive poetry I have read.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. J. Gomez says:

      Wow. Thank you for the compliment. Your comment had some great imagery as well. Thr flowered scent married with alcohol is certainly a distinct one that tends to leave an impression on the brain. Thank you for taking the time to read and share your experience

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you for the stirring poetry. I was eight at the time of my mother’s death but these things remain with us.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. J. Gomez says:

      Yes they do. I still remember when my grandfather passed. I was about the same age. Some things just stick with us. For better or worse.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. They do, as it shoul be.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. mikesteeden says:

    A wonderful cameo capturing the mood of a natural death within an equally wonderful understated yet not without passionate response. ‘Spirits spill sentiments between floor boards and brew aggression that brawls within broken glass’…words to savour again and again. Bravo, J Gomez

    Liked by 2 people

    1. J. Gomez says:

      Thank you Mike. I appreciate the thoughtful comment. I really liked that line as well

      Liked by 1 person

    2. J. Gomez says:

      Just want to add. Regarding the spirits line from the poem. I like that you pointed out that line. When I wrote it I was thinking of how to play with the words spirit and brew. Both in relation to alcohol. The word brew in some circles often is used for beer. And when writing that line I thought of playing with the idea of something bubbling or brewing. As in a feeling or emotion brewing. But also using the word as another form of beer to coincide with the word spirits which started the sentence off. I just wanted to add that bit. I felt my last respone was a bit rushed.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. mikesteeden says:

        It is a fine thing you let me know. I’d already got the feel of piece and the meanings within although as ever one doesn’t fully know the writers own take on the matter. I am grateful that you explained all. A wonderful piece I shall read again.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. J. Gomez says:

          Thank you Mike. That compliment really made my day. I apologize for the late response but 9 to 5 has been eating into my writer’s time. Once again much appreciative of the compliment. Have a great day

          Like

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